September 25, 2010

Johnny Boyd



  I just became familiar with the blog.
Thanks for the information and the videos posted there.
My Dad, Johnny Boyd, was mentioned on the blog and video by Vernon Jackson. He also was mentioned in video by Clair Brich.
My Dad grew up in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, was drafted and for some reason placed in this unit. After the war he returned to the farm he was raised on and that is where I grew up as well.


My Dad passed away in 1991.
I had not thought about these stories my Dad used to share for some time.

Just wondering if either Vernon Jackson or Clair Brich are still alive and if so, do you have any contact information for them.

Thanks.

Stanley Clair Boyd


s.c.boyd@charter.net

________

Glad to hear from you. I forwarded this email to Vernon Jackson and my father Clif Hullinger. Vernon was at the last 109th reunion in September 2010 in Rapid City.

I will post this email on the blog.  If you would like to write some more about your Dad or send some photos I would be glad to post them.

Same holds true for any member of relative of a member of the 109th from World War II

Craig Hullinger

craighullinger@gmail.com

http://craighullinger.com
___



Holy mollie I'm excited! And I'm beginning to appreciate your blog, Craig.
 
Much to our regret after Johnny died we lost contact completely with the Boyd's. Clair and I felt very close to Johnny and via two visits I made to them in North Carolina, Pine Level, I believe as I recall, and their visits to a couple of 109th reunions and once here to California. I called Johnny, Clair and I the Three Musketeers. Johnny's influence on both Clair and I kept us out of a lot of trouble during the war and Clair even credits me with influencing him to go to college after the war.
 
At the reunion I learned that Clair's life expectancy now is about 3-6 months with cancer. It's a real heartbreak to me. Please, Stanley Clair, update me on the Boyds. I'll communicate with your namesake, the other Clair, Clair Brich. I suspect your name was chosen because of your folks regard for Clair.
 
Except for the bad news about Clair Brich, the reunion was wonderful. Eight of us made it, last year only four, plus mates and families, of course.
 
Apparently you, Stanley, must have access to my autobiography which includes some detail about Johnny. But I would be very happy to have a personal contact with you via email or phone number 805-550-3119. This is a happy day for me.
 
Vern

To: s.c.boyd@charter.net; Clif Hullinger <clifhul@gmail.com>; Vernon Jackson <varj@sbcglobal.net>



September 21, 2010

Committee for the Recognition of US Actions on Mount Pantano







Hi,

I am the chairman and founder of C.R.A.M.P (The Committee for the Recognition of US Actions on Mount Pantano), the committee was formed in 2004 to inform, educate and advance the knowledge of this forgotten battle. We are currently lobbying for a substantial and permanent monument site to be placed at the foot of Mount Pantano honoring the 34th Division on the 70th anniversary of the battle in 2013.

Three weeks ago, a climbing team of committee members climbed Mount Pantano in southern Italy. Our mission, to place a small granite memorial plaque to honor the men of the 168th Regiment, 34th Division. 

The announcement below details the outcome of this endeavor.

Many thanks,

Committee Chairman

Emilio Menchini (UK)


The Committee for the Recognition of US Actions on Mount Pantano would like to announce the placing of a memorial plaque on the summit of Mount Pantano (Knob 1) to honor the brave men of the 168th Regimental Combat Team (34th Division) who fought and died defending this peak from November 29th - December 4th 1943.
The mountain was climbed on August 14th. 2010 by Bill & Anita Mckinley (Madison WI) and Gino Valerio (Glasgow Scotland) on behalf of C.R.A.M.P.

Chairman Emilio Menchini (Wales UK) coordinated the attempt from the Valley floor via radio communication from the nearby villages of Filignano & Cerasuolo.   

Bill Mckinley (vice chairman of CRAMP) read a poem on the mountain top written and published by his late father, Phil Mckinley (B company, 168th Regt.)  

Mount Pantano
(by Phil Mckinley)

 White clouds grazed like sheep across Pantano’s jagged crest,

Herded by the sheperd wind, nor did they wander,

For each kept his appointed course.  Abreast

They nibbled at the Alpine peak, bleak and somber.


But that was yesterday.


Today, a regiment holds the rocky peak,

A battered regiment – bleeding and weak

But to Hitler’s bastards – defiant still.

The orders read: “ Take, secure, and hold this hill.”

Tonight the regiment lies cursing, dying

In mud and snow, but still defying.


Mount Pantano, this battle streamer reads.

To the battle flag, attach it well!

It represents four days in hell.


The C.R.A.M.P committee will continue to lobby and petition for a substantial and permanent monument honouring the 168th & 135th Regiments of the 34th Division for their actions on Mount Pantano in 1943. For further information contact C.R.A.M.P at:


The Committee for the Recognition of US Actions on Mount Pantano
2010



September 18, 2010

Ben Kaiser

Vernon Jackson called me last night while on his way back west after the 109th reunion in 2010.  He said there were about 10 guys at the reunion which is pretty good considering their ages!  

He had stopped at the State Representatives office in Rapid City with your suggested write up and his story of the explosion and got the medal stuff started.  He then drove to Huron to see Helseth and get his story and talk over the incident.  He then passed that along to the Rep and says it is now "out of our hands". 

There are a lot of amazing coincidents in this case.  First Craig got the blog going on the 109th, then Al Kaiser read it and asked about Ben Kaiser which you passed along to me.  I was able to find the death report on Ben which includes Helseth's  name and his address from 3 years ago and he is still living.  

Then Vern sent his story in to you and got into your blog and I read it and saw his reference to Ben Kaiser and was able pass it on.  Craig said it deserved a medal and Vern got the process started.  Hope it works out OK but if not, some of us a least now know the story. The guys at the reunion know it too.

We had a lot of casualties that spring and summer. "A" Company had lost all our officers and got new ones in the weeks before moving to Anzio. 1st Sgt Hollister left and I moved up to his spot on Anzio and then go had my appendix out and didn't come back until after Leghorn.  By then all of our staff Sgts. Haug, Culver and Harding had been wounded and when I made 2nd Lt., all the non-coms were new at their jobs. I talked to  Buster Nelson, Ist Sgt of B company, about what a 1st. Sgt should do when we were at Anzio but he was gone when got my commission so I don't know who would have made out 'B' Company reports of the mine explosion.   
   
-- 

Clif Hullinger
2320 W 113th Place
Chicago, IL 60643
773 253 5426

clifhul@gmail.com

September 5, 2010

Medal Request PFC Benjamin Kaiser WW II

 September 6, 2010

The Honorable Stephanie Herseth Sandlin
343 Quincy Street
Rapid City, SD 57701

                               Re: Medal Request PFC Benjamin Kaiser WW II

Dear Congresswoman Sandlin:


          I respectfully request your assistance in recognizing the heroism of PFC Benjamin Kaiser during World War II in Italy.  After his untimely death In the course of heavy action north of Rome no one had the time to recognize and document his heroism.

          I served with the South Dakota National Guard 109th Combat Engineers during World War II. I have attached a proposed citation. The following is excerpted from my memoirs as I remember the action.

          " A Lieutenant took Joe Pauley and me to a beach somewhere north of Rome. It was a lovely sand beach a hundred or so yards long, with trees at the north end and buildings and a long pier at the south end.

     The trouble with the beach was a continuous series of tank mine patterns for its full length. Each pattern was about 30 yards long by 10 yards deep. They were Italian mines — wooden, canvas and with mostly plastic detonators and probably sixty mines in each pattern, four rows with mines six feet apart.

     They were not hard to find because some were exposed by blown away sand. By noon Joe and I had exploded probably three hundred mines, ten at a time with a block of TNT on each with detonators wired in series. Then the pattern changed and between each anti tank mine was an anti personnel mine — the dreaded “Bouncing Betty” S mines.

     We had gotten well into one such pattern when the Lt. came back, I guess to see if we’d blown ourselves up. His reaction was, “This job is too big for two men. I’ll get a line platoon out to help.” Forty men to replace two men!

     The Lt. left and when the platoon (about forty men) arrived we introduced two key GIs, Ben Kaiser and John Machnic, to the mine pattern where we had been working. Both were fully capable and experienced with mines, so Joe and I left and went to the far end of the beach and started working back, leaving them and their NCOs to plan their work.

     In about thirty minutes we heard a big bang and saw body parts flying. Something had triggered an S mine. I suspect it was booby trapped or a “hang fire” (partially activated detonator).

     In the four to seven seconds that Ben Kaiser had to think — between the detonator activation “pop” and the S mine coming out of the ground — he must have decided to try to keep the mine in the ground with his own body.

     It cost Ben his life. John Machnic was also killed.  Two other men were wounded by S mine pellets. We had a 4 x 4 weapons carrier (pickup truck) and hauled the two wounded, Ken Helseth and Ray Franz, to a field hospital. We returned to find we still had the job of reassembling Ben and taking his and John’s bodies to grave registration.

     Somehow even death can seem routine in some circumstances. At the time, his heroism wasn’t obvious. Decades later, when I was reviewing explosions that contributed to my hearing loss, I finally recognized the heroic act by Ben. He spared his platoon buddies from many casualties. If his platoon hadn’t taken over, Joe and I perhaps would have been the casualties.

     Since recognizing his very heroic action I’ve contacted Benny’s relatives in South Dakota and a brother and nephew in California who were most thankful to have knowledge beyond the simple military notice and especially of the almost certain act of heroism."

     I appreciate your effort to recognize the heroism of Benjamin Kaiser. Thank you for your consideration.


Sincerely,



Vernon Jackson






PFC BENJAMIN KAISER
109th ENGINEERS, 34th INFANTRY DIVISION
 SOUTH DAKOTA NATIONAL GUARD WW II
Citation to accompany the award of the Bronze Star Medal with V Device

FOR GALLANTRY IN ACTION AGAINST AN ARMED ENEMY, WHILE SERVING AS A COMBAT ENGINEER DURING OPERATIONS NORTH OF ROME, ITALY IN WORLD WAR II WITH THE 109TH ENGINEER BATTALION OF THE 34TH INFANTRY DIVISION. PFC KAISER WAS CLEARING A LARGE MINE FIELD NORTH OF ROME, ITALY.  THE WOODEN ITALIAN MINES WERE BOOBY TRAPPED WITH THE “BOUNCING BETTY S MINES, MAKING THE MINE CLEARING OPERATION VERY HAZARDOUS. IN THE FOUR TO SEVEN SECONDS THAT BEN KAISER HAD TO THINK FROM THE DETONATOR ACTIVATION “POP”AND THE S MINE COMING OUT OF THE GROUND PFC KAISER DECIDED TO KEEP THE MINE TO THE GROUND WITH HIS OWN BODY. HE THUS GAVE HIS LIFE TO SAVE THE LIVES OF HIS COMRADES. PFC KAISER'S PERSONAL COURAGE, TACTICAL EXPERTISE, AND PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE WAS DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR HIS PLATOON’S OVERALL SUCCESS AND SURVIVAL AND FOR THE SURVIVAL OF OTHER MEMBERS OF HIS PLATOON. HIS LEADERSHIP AND BRAVERY REFLECTED GREAT CREDIT UPON HIMSELF, THE 109TH COMBAT ENGINEERS, AND THE UNITED STATES ARMY.



August 11, 2010

Benjamin Kaiser, Kenneth A Helseth and Roy T Fran

Benjamin Kaiser was killed in Italy in World War II. His brother is looking for information about his death. 

Kenneth A Helseth and Roy T Fran were with him when he was wounded.
__________________

On Sun, Aug 8, 2010 at 4:31 PM, Al and Carol Kaiser  renorph@charter.net  wrote:

Dear Mr. Hullinger:

My name is Al Kaiser and I am a brother to Benjamin L. Kaiser who was killed some where near Anzio Beachhead. I am trying to find any information about the death of my brother. From what I understand they were clearing mines when one was detonated. One other died with my brother, and 2 were wounded. 

Kenneth A Helseth and Roy T Franz were wounded and I was wondering if any of these soldiers are still alive today or if you have any information about these 4 soldiers.  My brother was in the National Guard in Hot Springs, South Dakota when they were deployed.  If you have any information about the death of my brother, please get in touch with me.  

My e-mail is: renorph@charter.net

Thank you.

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑

Hi Al: 

Yes, I knew Ben Kaiser but not very well. He was mobilized with D company from Hot Springs and was moved to B Company when the Division was reorganized into the "triangular" structure just before we went overseas in Jan. 1942. 

I had been in A Company but was in the hospital at that time.  However I have a copy of a hardcover book,  " South Dakota in World War II" which lists the men mobilized with the 109th guard  units and Ben Kaiser is listed on page 67  "23 Kaiser, Benjamin L. - Killed in action near Vara Italy on June 21, 1944  T/5.”  

He is pictured with D Company on page 68. Then on Page 198 and 199 is the following: "The next few days were to witness a series of casualties in or near the neighborhood of Leghorn. 

Leghorn was one of the best seaports in Italy and quite essential to the  progress of the American Army further north and area about Leghorn had been abundantly mined.  On the 20th of July Ben L. Kaiser of Hot Springs and Machnik were killed, and Kenneth A Helseth, Huron, and Roy T. Franze, were wounded by the explosion of an S-mine on the beach one-half mile south of Vada."  That reference to Franze and Machnik is the only mention of them in the book !!!  Also the Vara and Vada are the spellings in the book and not my typo!!

We have had reunions in Rapid City for many years but I doubt that anyone will make it this year. Sorry I can't help more. 

Clif Hullinger 

_____     


Clif Hullinger:

Thank you for answering my e-mail and giving me what information you know about Ben. I do have the hard copy of South Dakota in World War II. I was hoping that I may be able to make contact with Kenneth A. Helseth and Roy T Franz if they are still alive.  They were on the same mission as Ben and were wounded when trying to clear that mine field.  

Is there any way you can put the word out to see if either are still alive?  Maybe there is some one else out there that might remember that particular tragedy 1/2 mile south of Vada, Italy.

I really do appreciate all your efforts in trying to get this documented.

Thanks again:

Al Kaiser
______________

We will put the word out on the109th Engineers Blog and on the 34th Infantry Division Facebook Page.


Craig Hullinger
_____________


Success: And interesting that this connection was made on the 65th anniversary of the end of WW II in Europe.


Hi Al and Carol:   I have just received and forwarded (I hope !) history of Vernon Jackson's experience in "our war".   The title is misleading since it reads like it is from Lorraine Gear but it is a very good history of Vernon Jackson's experiences.  We were in the same company and I can vouch for his general accuracy although almost 70 years have slipped by and there has been some other "slippage" too!   However he includes the details of Ben Kaiser's death that you will be very interested in. 


The German  S-mine was a very effective antipersonnell device.  When tripped, a small charge blew a cannister with a larger charge surrounded by many ball bearings or shrapnel would explode and kill people  for many yards around.  There are very few seconds between the two explosions but there is time for someone to throw himself on the mine and minimize the effect of the second explosion.  He says that Ben's body was broken up which suggests that might have happened.  You can e-mail Vern at the above address or call him in CA at 805-474-4104.   
-- 
Clif Hullinger
2320 W 113th Place
Chicago, IL 60643
773 253 5426
______________



 Ben Kaiser and John Machnic


Excerpted from Vernon A. Jackson's remembrances of World War II
Written July 2010






"Then there is my own private terror, again not in combat. A lieutenant took Joe Pauley and me to a beach somewhere north of Rome. It was a lovely sand beach a hundred or so yards long, with trees at the north end and buildings and a long pier at the south end. I guess someone wanted to go swimming there.
The trouble with the beach was a continuous series of tank mine patterns for its full length. Each pattern was about 30 yards long by 10 yards deep. They were Italian mines—wooden, canvas and with mostly plastic detonators and probably sixty mines in each pattern, four rows with mines six feet apart.
They were not hard to find because some were exposed by blown away sand. By noon Joe and I had exploded probably three hundred mines, ten at a time with a block of TNT on each with detonators wired in series. Then the pattern changed and between each anti tank mine was an anti personnel mine—the dreaded “Bouncing Betty” S mines.
We had gotten well into one such pattern when the Lt. came back, I guess to see if we’d blown ourselves up. His reaction was, “This job is too big for two men. I’ll get a line platoon out to help.” Forty men to replace two men!
The Lt. left and when the platoon (about forty men) arrived we introduced two key GIs, Ben Kaiser and John Machnic, to the mine pattern where we had been working. Both were fully capable and experienced with mines, so Joe and I left and went to the far end of the beach and started working back, leaving them and their NCOs to plan their work.
 In about thirty minutes we heard a big bang and saw body parts flying. Something had triggered an S mine. I suspect it was booby trapped or a “hang fire” (partially activated detonator). In the four to seven seconds that Ben Kaiser had to think—between the detonator activation “pop” and the S mine coming out of the ground—he must have decided to try to keep the mine in the ground with his own body.
It cost Ben and John Machnic their lives. Two men were wounded by S mine pellets. We had a 4 x 4 weapons carrier (pickup truck) and hauled the two wounded, Ken Helseth and Ray Franz, to a field hospital. We returned to find we still had the job of reassembling Ben and taking his and John’s bodies to grave registration.
Somehow even death can seem routine in some circumstances. At the time, his heroism wasn’t obvious. Decades later, when I was reviewing explosions that contributed to my hearing loss, I finally recognized the heroic act by Ben. He spared his platoon buddies from many casualties. If his platoon hadn’t taken over, Joe and I perhaps would have been the casualties . (There is more story here. Please see special write-up and picture in the accompanying album.)
Since recognizing his very heroic action I’ve contacted Benny’s relatives in South Dakota and a brother and nephew in California who were most thankful to have knowledge beyond the simple military notice and especially of the almost certain act of heroism."

Vernon Jackson






July 12, 2010

WW1 and WW2 era helmets

Hello Gentlemen,

I collect WW1 and WW2 era helmets and militaria.  When I removed the liner frame(it didn't have a liner) from a recently acquired US M1917A1 helmet, I found some black markings inside the helmet that appear to read "109 ENG.".  There are other markings but unfortunately time has worn them away.  I posted pictures of my new helmet in one of my favorite military forums, and a kind gentleman there pointed me to your blog.  I've enjoyed what I've read of your blog and I thought you may be interested in my helmet's markings.  Does this helmet look like a lid from the 109th?  I've attached the pictures that I have.
Thanks for your time.

-Jason Jensen














Clif Hullinger



Hi Jason:   I joined the 109th Engineers, a National Guard unit in South Dakota in 1939.   We had the old WW-I uniforms and helmets at that time. The wrap leggings, broad rim campaign hats and the whole bit.  We still had the same equipment when we mobilized in Jan. 1941 and went to Camp Claibourne, LA.  During the summer we started getting WW-II clothing and I think were issued the new helmets in the fall of 1941 about the time of Pearl Harbor but I am not sure of that.  They were a lot more useful and a big improvement and we were glad to get rid of the old ones. Better protection for the back of the neck and ears etc. We could use them as a seat when in mud or snow and could take out the liners and make a fair washbasin out of the metal part. By time we got to North Africa, we had a string mesh over them which supposedly served to soften the outline or reflection but probably did more for our morale than for our safety!     

      Your Model 1917 helmet is probably one of those we dumped in 1941. Or it could have been excess equipment left behind in the SD National Guard units when we mobilized.  

--
Clif Hullinger
2320 W 113th Place
Chicago, IL 6064
3
773 253 5426



July 8, 2010

34th Infantry Division Association Newsletter

34th Infantry Division logo
 34th Inf Div Assn 'Home Page'SiteMap  

National Association       Council Bluffs Chapter       Des Moines Chapter       Tri-State Chapter      

*** Assistance in Locating a Veteran's Records ***

Affiliated website:  Military History Network

ruler

News, Notes, and Updates

Current Forces News

The 'Ryder Brigade Combat Team' - otherwise known as the 2/34 BCT of the 34th Infantry Division and the Iowa National Guard - is NOW preparing to deploy to Afghanistan. Two of its units you well remember from World War II: the 1st Battalion, 133rd Infantry and the 1st Battalion, 168th Infantry.
They are now publishing the Ryder Dispatch newsletters online. PDF downloadable files are available for March and April-May 2010.JUN

Red Bull Veterans Search Forum

The message forums which supported searches for our veterans have been taken offline. It has become an impractical task to proper edit and organize entries for such a search directory in this one-man operation.  2010.JUN

Newsletters

The Summer 2010 National Association Newsletter is now online and downloadable as a PDF file. It includes the membership form and registration/program information for the 9th-12th September reunion in Iowa. 2010.MAY
You will also find below new sections of information for the Council Bluffs Chapter and Des Moines Chapter and registration/program information for the 12th-16th July Tri-State ChapterChapter reunion. 2010.JUN


ruler

Featured Items

135th Infantry Regiment in World War II

A new collection of the 1941-1945 histories of the 135th Infantry Regiment is now online and presented in our history section. 2010.JAN

168th Infantry Regiment in North Africa

A report by Col. Thomas Drake, commanding the 168th Infantry Regiment in Tunisia, was recently uncovered at the Iowa Gold Star Military Museum. This was his official report of the actions leading up to the capture of much of the Regiment in February 1943. It is now available here as a PDF file, 6.5 MB, Tunisian Operations, 168th Infantry.
In accepting Col. Drake's report, Major General Charles Ryder wrote on 1 May 1945:
"Knowing the conditions, I can only marvel at the gallantry of the 168th Infantry and yourself in the face of overwhelming odds. You and you alone were fighting the entire German armored force of General Rommel and the delay you caused saved the Allied Forces in Southern Tunisia from disaster. Both of you wrote a page in American history for which you can be well proud. The blame for your defeat can only be layed on the shoulders of those who completely failed to come to your support as had been planned."
ruler

Taps, Again: Troops in Harm's Way

Too many of our own soldiers - the 34th Infantry Division "Desert Bulls" - have died in the U.S. Central Command theater. We know, from our own experiences in World War II, what it means to lose a fellow Red Bull. To their families, their friends, their comrades of this generation, we present this small remembrance in their honor, in your honor.
We have 'tuned' a prior listing of the casualties of our 1st Brigade Combat Team in Iraq 2006-2007, and added information on the losses within or assigned to our Division Headquarters in Iraq 2009 while in command of the Coalition Force's MultiNational Division South at Basra.
That latter webpage uses text and images from a former website of Div HQ while it was deployed in Iraq.
"May they have no more hills to climb,
nor cold, nor rain, nor mud, nor enemy fire,
and may they now rest in Peace."

ruler

34ID crest

National Association
Communications • News • Notices

President: Pat Skelly
Secretary: Russ Bierl

•  Summer 2010 Newsletter (PDF File) 2010.MAY
•  Winter 2010 Newsletter (PDF File)
•  Fall 2009 Newsletter (PDF File)
•  Winter 2009 Newsletter (PDF File)
•  Fall 2008 Newsletter (PDF File)
• April 2008 Newsletter (PDF File)
• January 2008 Newsletter (PDF File)
• November 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• May 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• April 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)

The association's postal address is:
34th Infantry Division Association
Iowa Gold Star Museum, Bldg A-9
7105 NW 70th Avenue
Johnston IA 50131-1824

Council Bluffs Chapter
Communications • News • Notices
 

President: Robert E Wege
Secretary: Leslie L Jerome

This chapter, with about forty members, does not publish bulletins. Their members meet at monthly luncheons or dinners. They also host an annual Christmas Dinner.
The chapter's postal address is:
Council Bluffs Chapter
34th Infantry Division Association
208 Sylvan Dr
Council Bluffs IA 51503

Des Moines Chapter
Communications • News • Notices
 

President: Herman Poggensee
Secretary: Ken Andresen

• 2010-2011 Meetings Calendar (MS Word file)
• June 2010 Meeting Announcement and Report (Text file)
• April 2010 Meeting Announcement and Report (Text file)
• March 2010 Meeting Announcement and Report (Text file)
• February 2010 Meeting Announcement and Report (PDF file)
• 2010 National Reunion Assignments (MS Word file)

The chapter's postal address is:
Des Moines Chapter
34th Infantry Division Association
7105 NW 70th Ave, Camp Dodge
Johnston IA 50131-1824

Tri-State Chapter
Communications • News • Notices

President: John Minotti
Secretary: Rebecca Snyder Phillips

• 2010 Reunion (PDF File) 2010.JUN
• 2010 Membership (PDF File) 2010.JUN
• March 2009 Newsletter (PDF File)
• April 2008 Newsletter (PDF File)
• December 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• August 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• June 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• May 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• March 2007 Newsletter (PDF File)
• Standing Rules of the Chapter

The chapter's postal address is: 2010.JUN
Tri-State Chapter
34th Infantry Division Association
3439 Midvale Ave
Philadelphia PA 19129-1405


ruler

Principal Directory of Contents

If you have problems using these 'pull-down' menus, please let the Webmaster know; you may find it easier to use the SiteMap at the top of this page.
This Directory section is being redesigned, so don't expect perfection ... yet. Thanks.
ruler

Who Were We?
WW II Order of Battle - 34th Infantry Division

  • Headquarters, 34th Infantry Division
  • 133rd Infantry Regiment
       100th Infantry Battalion (Separate) [assigned Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno]
  • 135th Infantry Regiment
  • 168th Infantry Regiment
       168th Commandos
  • 442nd Regimental Combat Team [attached Rome-Arno]
       442nd Infantry Regiment
          100th Infantry Battalion
       232nd Engineeer (Combat) Company
       442nd Medical Detachment
       522nd Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
  • 34th Division Artillery
       34th Division Artillery Headquarters and Headquarters Battery
       125th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
          (normally in support of the 133rd Inf. Regt.)
       151st Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
          (normally in support of the 135th Inf. Regt.)
       175th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
          (normally in support of the 168th Inf. Regt.)
       185th Field Artillery Battalion (155mm)
  • 34th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
  • 109th Engineer (Combat) Battalion
  • 109th Medical Battalion
  • 34th Division Special Troops
       Headquarters, Special Troops, 34th Division
       34th Infantry Division Headquarters Company
       34th Infantry Division Band
       Military Police Platoon, 34th Division
       34th Counter-Intelligence Detachment [attached]
       34th Quartermaster Company
       34th Signal Company
       734th Ordnance (Light Maintenance) Company

Other Attached Units

  • Jewish Infantry Brigade (attached Occupation)
  • A Company, 2nd Chemical Warfare Battalion (attached Naples-Foggia)
  • 35th Quartermaster War Dog Platoon (attached North Apennines)
  • 38th Infantry Scout Dog Platoon (attached Occupation)
  • 72nd Signal Company (Special) (attached Naples-Foggia)
  • 84th Chemical Mortar Battalion (attached North Apennines)
  • 100th Chemical Mortar Battalion (attached North Apennines, Po Valley)
  • 105th AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled) (attached Naples-Foggia)
  • 107th Coast Artillery Battalion (AAA Automatic Weapons) Battalion (attached Tunisia)
  • A Company, 191st Tank Battalion (attached Naples-Foggia)
  • 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment (attached North Apennines)
  • 432nd AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion (attached North Apennines)
  • 435th AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled) (attached Anzio)
  • 443rd AAA Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled) (attached Tunisia)
  • 751st Tank Battalion (attached Tunisia)
  • 752nd Tank Battalion (attached Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley, Occupation)
  • 753rd Tank Battalion (attached Rome-Arno)
  • 757th Tank Battalion (attached North Apennines)
  • 776th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached Naples-Foggia)
  • 804th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached North Apennines)
  • 807th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached North Apennines)
  • 813th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached Tunisia)
  • 894th Tank Destroyer Battalion (attached Rome-Arno)
  • and still other units which remain to be found, confirmed, and listed here.

    Special Notes

    The 100th Infantry Battalion (Nisei)(Separate), which stood in for the 2nd Battalion, 133rd Infantry, from September 1943 through May 1944, and the 442nd Infantry Regiment (Nisei) which was attached to our Division from June 1944 through August 1944, have an especially honored place in our memories and history. We are pleased and likewise honored that many of their veterans have come to look upon the "Red Bull" as their 'home' division. That Battalion is now deployed to Iraq!
    The 1st Ranger Battalion, though not a part of the 34th Inf Div, was activated in 1942 with 80% of its personnel coming from this Division.
    I'm delighted to report that I'm finding references to more units which were attached to the Division as I'm transcribing our narrative history documents; they all get recognized above. Please be aware, though, that attachments were often for periods of days or weeks, not for an entire campaign.

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    Updated 2010 June 26.
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